HPTN 062

Feasibility and Acceptability Study of an Individual-Level Behavioral Intervention for Individuals with Acute and Early HIV-Infection

Study Summary
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What is HPTN 062?

HPTN 062 was a research study conducted in Lilongwe, Malawi to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of an enhanced, individual-level counseling intervention for individuals in the acute and early phase of HIV infection aimed at reducing risk behaviors.

Who participated in the study?

A total of 28 participants diagnosed with acute HIV infection (AHI) were randomized to receive either brief education alone, or the brief education plus the Motivational Interviewing (MI)-based intervention, called Uphungu Wanga.

What happened during the study?

Participants in Uphungu Wanga received four sessions delivered on the day of diagnosis, three days later and at weeks 1 and 2 with a booster session at week 8; participants were followed for 24 weeks from diagnosis. An interviewer administered quantitative questionnaire was conducted at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24. Semi-structured qualitative interviews (SSI) were conducted at weeks 2, 8, 12, and 24.

Results:

The majority of participants in both arms reported rapid and sustained behavior change following diagnosis with acute HIV infection. Very few participants reported having sex without a condom after diagnosis. Participants reported a trend towards fewer sex partners and abstaining from sex during study follow-up. Participants in the MI-based arm provided concrete examples of risk reduction strategies in the SSIs while those in the brief education arm primarily described reducing risk behavior, suggesting that the MI-based group may have acquired more risk reduction skills.

Study Documents

HPTN 062 Version 3.0

HPTN 062 Version 2.0